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Wednesday April 29, 2020

8:00 am - 5:00 pm Preconference Sessions - Full Day

Book Mending

Carolee Harrison, Amy Bell

Registration Fee

$135

Description

The Support Staff Division presents a favorite from our annual Support Staff Division Conference: book mending!

Budgets are tight--for both libraries and the communities we serve. Library users rely on the library for free access to information and entertainment; libraries need to practice good stewardship of library materials and resources. Book mending keeps print materials in good shape and allows libraries to circulate print materials longer, providing more access for more patrons and conserving money.

This session will provide information, training, and resources about mending techniques. Attendees will gain book mending expertise with hands on practice mending damaged books in class. Covered repairs include: torn/broken hinges, torn/fallen pages, roughed-up corners, detached covers, and spine replacement. The workshop price includes a basic mending kit that will be used in class and is theirs to keep. Resources for additional repair methods and resources for purchasing mending supplies will also be provided. Bring your questions and examples!

Wed 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
Preconference

Explorations of Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion in Cataloging

Emily O’Neal, Jane Sandberg, Ryan Hildebrand, Lori Robare

Registration Fee

$115

Description

During this full-day preconference, participants will learn about, think about, and talk about how to build capacity for equity, diversity, and inclusion (EDI) in cataloging work. Experienced catalogers will present on topics including gender in name authority records, bias in subject headings, and how new controlled vocabularies can be used to surface the work of underrepresented groups in the catalog. We will screen the documentary “Change the Subject” about the effort by Dartmouth College students and librarians to update the “illegal aliens” Library of Congress subject heading. All participants will have opportunities to share ideas and learn from one another in small breakout discussions.

Wed 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
Diversity, Equity, Inclusion
Preconference

Protecting Privacy in Technology Decisions

Ellie Avis, Kelly McElroy, Sarah White

Registration Fee

$100

Description

Privacy is a core library value, but we live in an era of data breaches and constant surveillance. As all aspects of library work increasingly incorporate digital technologies, how can library professionals reconcile our values with this shifting technological and legal landscape? Issues of digital surveillance disproportionately affect the poor, communities of color, and other marginalized groups through profiling and digital redlining. As libraries navigate the adoption of new technologies, collect and manage patron data, and negotiate contracts with vendors, how can we ensure that our decisions are informed, ethical, and protect the most vulnerable members of our communities?

In this interactive workshop, Library Freedom Project members will walk you through conceptual frameworks and practical tools to guide privacy decision-making for your library. You will learn about harm reduction, threat modeling, data minimization, and how to analyze a privacy policy. You will consider how your professional and institutional values intersect with current digital privacy issues, and practice working through real-life technology decisions, including licensing subscription databases and updating public access computers. Protecting privacy is a key element of the library’s role in democracy. Empower yourself and your community to take back control of your data.

Wed 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
Preconference

8:00 am - 12:00 pm Preconference Sessions - Half Day, Morning

Beyond Talk! Operationalizing Equity 101

Thomas Bruner

Registration Fee

$75

Description

How do organizations and their leaders take concepts of equity, diversity, and inclusion and make them real? Where do they start? Who does what when? And what does “change” actually look like?

We will identify practical ways to begin advancing equity on the people side of your organization, including your boards, staff, clients, and volunteers. Come prepared to learn about evidence-based practices found in high-performing organizations, and changes you can make in policies and procedures.

This session is for organizations at the beginning of their EDI journey, ready to begin making practical, concrete changes to operationalize equity.

Thomas Bruner is the president of Bruner Strategies.
Wed 8:00 am - 12:00 pm
Diversity, Equity, Inclusion
Preconference

Not If, But When: Books for Young People About Death and Loss

Mary Eaton, Sylvia Tag, Thom Barthelmess

Registration Fee

$60

Description

Death is a natural part of our time on earth together. Each of us will lose people important to us, and each of us will die. The question is not if, but when.

Children and teens facing the loss of friends and family, or their own mortality, need help navigating the emotional, physical, and practical upheavals and restorations that are part of the natural process. Books offer opportunities to ask questions, wonder, and simply acknowledge the realities of their circumstances.

We tend to broach the subject of death with young people only after death has occurred or becomes imminent. By "protecting" children from these conversations we inadvertently prevent them from acquiring the skills and context necessary to make sense of death when it does arrive. Introducing the subject through books and stories provides a safe and comfortable context for these important conversations.

Wed 8:00 am - 12:00 pm
Preconference

Serving Those Who Need It Most: Delivering Equitable Outreach in Your Community

Ashley Folgate, Rodrigo Gaspar-Barajas, Alice MacGougan, Ana Ruiz Morillo, Kate Schwab, Gesse Stark-Smith

Registration Fee

$65

Description

“My library’s outreach is totally efficient and effective, and we are definitely reaching those who need our services most,” said no librarian ever.

Yes, libraries are all stretched thin and, yes, we’re all doing our best, but are we really doing all we can to make our outreach not equal, but equitable? Are we distributing our resources according to the level of need or simply by who asks first?

In this half-day preconference session, we will provide you with concrete tools to prioritize your outreach activities to better serve the people who will benefit most from all your library has to offer. In addition, experienced librarians will share what they have learned about how best to work with a wide array of Oregonians, including Latinx, homebound, and people experiencing houselessness.

Wed 8:00 am - 12:00 pm
Equity
Preconference

9:00 am - 3:00 pm State Library of Oregon Board Meeting

State Library of Oregon Board Meeting

Wed 9:00 am - 3:00 pm
Meeting

10:30 am - 11:00 am Break

Morning Break

Conference Center Hall

Refreshments

  • Assorted pastries
  • Coffee and tea

Wed 10:30 am - 11:00 am
All Together

12:00 pm - 1:00 pm Lunch

Lunch

Cascade Ballroom

Each lunch includes kettle potato chips, chocolate chip cookie, and bottled water. Box lunches are also available as Gluten-Free; check your preference on the registration form.

Boxed Lunch 1

Grilled marinated vegetable wrap with hummus and fresh mozzarella cheese. (Vegetarian)

Boxed Lunch 2

Roasted turkey sandwich with Swiss cheese, lettuce, and cranberry aioli on ciabatta bread.

Boxed Lunch 3

Cured ham sandwich with lettuce, tomato, pickle, swiss cheese, and Dijon mayonnaise on a baguette.

Wed 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
All Together

1:00 pm - 5:00 pm Preconference Sessions - Half Day, Afternoon

Beyond Talk! Operationalizing Equity 201

Thomas Bruner

Registration Fee

$75

Description

At the end of the day, operationalizing equity takes more than meetings, trainings, and workshops. It requires actual change. How do organizations who are doing equity, diversity, and inclusion work continue advancing their efforts? Come prepared to discuss what your organization has done, or is doing, to advance equity, diversity, and inclusion, what has and has not worked, and lessons learned so far.

This session is for organizations who are on their EDI journey, ready to take steps to reach the next level.

Thomas Bruner is the president of Bruner Strategies.
Wed 1:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Diversity, Equity, Inclusion
Preconference

Inspirations, Burdens, and Other Lies: The Disability Community in the Library

Bryce Kozla, Jennifer Giovanetti

Registration Fee

$45

Description

A welcoming and accessible environment for people with disabilities is crucial to ensure that libraries are truly for everyone; however, the dominant societal narrative tells us lies about disability that can keep us from fully embracing and prioritizing people with disabilities in our work.

This engaging preconference will invite participants to examine the dominant societal narrative around disability; consider how that can affect our work both at individual and organizational levels; and become empowered to advocate for the disability community in their library. Attendees will leave with a plan of action to inform their work.

Content note: this preconference may be particularly challenging to engage with for staff who are disabled, or have a close friend or family member with a disability.

Wed 1:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Inclusion
Preconference

Knowledge is Health: The Intersection Between Health Information and Health Literacy

Angela Lee, Karen Flaherty

Registration Fee

$65

Description

The provision of health information is an important goal for most public and academic librarians wanting to insure their users become health literate. Librarians have a long history of delivering health information services to consumers; they now have an opportunity to become key partners in advancing health literacy in their library. How can librarians accomplish this? They can become more knowledgeable about health information sources, learn how to answer health questions, teach users how to find and select good health information, and recognize the issues of low health literacy while practicing the principles of EDI.

This 4-hour workshop offers training in providing health information services to your users and is designed for librarians who want to advocate for health literacy. This workshop will highlight the MLA Consumer Health Information Specialization (CHIS) and cover:

  1. Introduction to health information resources: MedlinePlus, PubMed, Genetic Home Reference
  2. Evaluate health information for quality to build a good consumer health collection
  3. Learn how to conduct an effective health reference interview
  4. Help users find and select appropriate health information
  5. Identify issues of low health literacy, educating users about health literacy, learning how to help users become health literate, and developing a repository of educational materials

Wed 1:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Preconference

2:00 pm - 5:00 pm OLA Board Meeting

OLA Board Meeting

Wed 2:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Meeting

3:00 pm - 3:30 pm Break

Afternoon Break

Conference Center Hall

Refreshments

  • Assorted cookies
  • Iced tea
  • Pepsi products

Wed 3:00 pm - 3:30 pm
All Together

5:00 pm - 7:00 pm ACRL Off-Site Reception

ACRL-OR Reception

Wed 5:00 pm - 7:00 pm
Special Ticketed Event

6:00 pm - 9:00 pm PLD Banquet

Public Library Division Banquet

Cascade Ballroom

Come enjoy an evening of celebration and meeting up with friends at the PLD Banquet. Enjoy a tasty meal, fascinating conversation, and networking with fellow public library folks. This year's banquet features guest speaker Kerani Mitchell, founding partner of Allyship in Action, an equity and inclusion consulting firm in Bend. The reception will also include presentation of the Pearl Award.

Menu

The buffet dinner will include salads, tortilla chips and salsa, various toppings, and an assorted dessert display. The main dishes will be...

  • Cheese enchiladas. (Vegetarian)
  • Fajitas with grilled beef or chicken with peppers and onions. Served with flour tortillas. 

A no-host bar is included.

Keynote Speaker: Kerani Mitchell

As an East Indian adoptee raised in small Oregon towns, Kerani Mitchell has spent her life building bridges across difference. A country-music lover who rebelled against yoga, Mitchell raised farm animals in her youth and is accustomed to challenging stereotypes about race and identity. After obtaining a B.A. in International Studies from Seattle University, she pursued a career in the nonprofit sector. She has worked with students on leadership and creative expression and on diversity, equity and inclusion projects with government and nonprofits. She is a founding partner of Allyship in Action, an equity and inclusion consulting firm in Bend, Oregon and an accountant at Groundswell Fund, a national foundation. She balances community-building, motherhood, and advocacy for people of color and LGBTQ folks with gardening, bird watching, and reading as much as she can.  As a board member at Oregon Humanities and longtime patron of the Deschutes Public Library, she is honored by the invitation to speak for OLA.

Kerani Mitchell
Wed 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
Special Ticketed Event

Thursday April 30, 2020

7:30 am - 8:30 am Business Meetings

Public Library Division Meeting

Thu 7:30 am - 8:30 am
Meeting

Special Districts Meeting

Thu 7:30 am - 8:30 am
Meeting

Staff Training Round Table Meeting

Thu 7:30 am - 8:30 am
Meeting

8:30 am - 10:00 am Opening Session and Keynote

Opening Session and Keynote Address

Sonja ErvinCascade Ballroom

Sonja is Multnomah County Library's first ever equity and inclusion manager.  She leads efforts to ensure library services, programs, staffing, materials, and spaces are equitable, inclusive, and culturally responsive. Her work involves leading staff in thoughtful discussions about equity and inclusion and outlining actionable steps to improve the library's efforts both internally and for the community. She provides support and holds space for library staff who face experiences of racism and oppression. She is also the executive sponsor for the Black Cultural Library Advocate team.

Prior to joining the library, Sonja engaged in street and shelter outreach and developed culturally specific programs and services with community members experiencing houselessness, addictions, and mental illness. She brings this experience to the library with the goal of expanding the ways the library can fulfill its commitment to welcoming and serving those in our community who have been and continue to be  subjected to the highest levels of marginalization.

Her vision for public libraries is that every person, regardless of who they are, where they come from, or their current or past experiences and circumstances, feel connected and a sense of community as they walk through the library doors.  

Sonja Ervin
Thu 8:30 am - 10:00 am
Diversity, Equity, Inclusion
All Together

10:00 am - 11:00 am Exhibits Grand Opening and Poster Session

Exhibits Grand Opening

Exhibits Hall

Let's give a big welcome to all of our valued exhibitors! Vendors will be set up in the Exhibits Hall downstairs, ready to chat with you about their products and services.

Refreshments

  • Bagels with cream cheese
  • Donuts
  • Coffee and tea

Thu 10:00 am - 11:00 am
All Together

Poster Session

Exhibits Hall

Library professionals and researchers will display posters and discuss their work in the Exhibits Hall.

Thu 10:00 am - 11:00 am
All Together

11:00 am - 12:30 pm Program Sessions 1

Engaging Teens with Connected Learning and Computational Thinking

Greta Bergquist, Danielle Jones

This workshop introduces participants to the core concepts of Connected Learning and Computational Thinking. Participants explore the principles of Connected Learning and how to connect Connected Learning theory to practice. Also, participants get hands-on experience and a chance to discuss what computational thinking is and how it can be integrated into teen activities.

Presenters:

  • Greta Bergquist, Youth Services Consultant, State Library of Oregon
  • Danielle Jones, Youth and Teen Librarian, Multnomah County Library

Thu 11:00 am - 12:30 pm
Program Session

Examining Tribal History Through an Indigenous Perspective

Jaylyn Suppah, Jillisa Suppah, Charlene Dimmick

Exploring a brief history of the Tribes within the Central Oregon area through an indigenous perspective with a short overview of the Tribes of Oregon. We will examine the history of local tribes around education, food sovereignty, land acknowledgements, learn about ceded lands and what that means. We will explore how we can be more inclusive, connecting to resources and how to be an ally.

Presenters:

  • Jaylyn Suppah
  • Jillisa Suppah
  • Charlene Dimmick

Thu 11:00 am - 12:30 pm
Diversity, Equity
Program Session

LIOLA: Developing Leaders at Every Level

Melissa Little, Sarah M. Cunningham, Mary Kay Dahlgreen, Rya Fennewald, Courtney Gill, Erin McCaslin Kooyman, Kathy Street, Lori Wamsley

Is it LI-OLA or LEE-OLA? However you say it, the Leadership Institute of the Oregon Library Association has helped develop and support library leaders and those wishing to develop into leadership roles. Two cohorts have completed and learned skills to help recognize their own leadership strengths, developed strategies to use those strengths, and created a support network of seasoned library leaders.

This inclusive program has lessons for any one at any level in any type of library. Come hear the experiences of cohort members, mentors, and facilitators. Learn about plans for the LIOLA 2021 and see if it sounds right for you.

Moderator:

  • Melissa Little, Circulation Manager, Beaverton City

Panelists:

  • Sarah M. Cunningham, Assistant Cataloger, State Library of Oregon
  • Mary Kay Dahlgreen, Director, Lincoln County Library District
  • Rya Fennewald, Community Librarian, Deschutes Public Library
  • Courtney Gill, Library Supervisor, Hillsboro Public Library
  • Erin McCaslin Kooyman, Library Experience + Access Department (LEAD), Oregon State University Libraries and Press
  • Kathy Street, Director, Oregon Trail Library District.
  • Lori Wamsley, Faculty Librarian & Library Instruction Coordinator, Mt. Hood Community College.

Thu 11:00 am - 12:30 pm
Program Session

Othering in the Library

Sonja Ervin

Whether or not we are aware of it, history and systems of oppression affect the library. Join us to learn more about how historical experiences--across the Country and Oregon's history as a white homeland--have created intergenerational patterns of library use, how we can work to interrupt systemic oppression, and where we have space to learn and grow.

Presenter:

  • Sonja Ervin, Equity and Inclusion Manager, Multnomah County Library

Thu 11:00 am - 12:30 pm
Diversity, Equity
Program Session

Persona Dolls: Uplifting Children's Social Identities

Hadiyah Miller

The development of Persona Dolls to reflect Black children's race, gender, ability, age, language, family composition, culture, ethnicity, socio-economic status, and religion identities. Examine how to select dolls, topics and concepts to foster and engage children's self-identity for themselves and peers in the classrooms community. Examine the process for sharing Persona Dolls during group time.

Presenter:

  • Hadiyah Miller, Early Childhood Consultant

Thu 11:00 am - 12:30 pm
Diversity, Inclusion
Program Session

Weeding: It's Okay!

Kate Lasky, Penny Hummel, Catherine Jasper, Esther Moberg.

From public outcry to community engagement, weeding is one of the most challenging aspects of good librarianship. How we pre-plan internal and external communications, work with other libraries, and embrace transparency can make all the difference and influence positive outcomes. With space limitations and the need to update collections to address diversity, equity, and inclusion, weeding materials is a critical step to achieving excellence in public service.

In this workshop, participants will review a positive case study of Josephine Community Library as they tackled weeding 35,000 items in six months with guidance from Deschutes Public Library and Penny Hummel Consulting. Participants will also learn about weeding projects across Oregon that didn’t go as planned and how best to prepare for the worst-case scenario. Through facilities planning and developing new weeding systems, this workshop will cover policy development, volunteer engagement, staff and board communications, public relations, and efficient ways to rehome weeded material and make room for new items on old shelves.

Participants will walk away with new tools for implementing small and large weeding projects in their library systems, and most importantly, the confidence to openly weed with pride!

Presenters:

  • Kate Lasky - Library Director, Josephine Community Library District
  • Penny Hummel - Library Consultant, Penny Hummel Consulting
  • Catherine Jasper - Collection Development Librarian, Deschutes Public Library
  • Esther Moberg - Library Director, Seaside Public Library

Thu 11:00 am - 12:30 pm
Program Session

Welcoming Equity, Diversity, and Inclusivity

Shane Davis, Martha Sutherland

How can libraries extend the engaging activities that young adult spaces afford to the service areas that adults enjoy?

Using similar methods of offering activities appropriate to the space creates community, stimulates minds, and provides opportunities for expression, friendship and well-being. At the Eugene Public Library, we encourage equity, diversity and inclusion through these engaging experiences and want to encourage other libraries to do the same. Beyond the Maker Hub and Media Lab, our library offers a variety of self-serve activities to anyone who walks through the doors. No library card is required to put together puzzles, write a thought on the Community Engagement Board, play records and games, write a review of a musical work, color and draw, play and compose music at a digital keyboard, create poetry, exchange recipes, make stationery and more.

Join us in an exploration of new ideas and share what you may have already tried in your own library. What works? What doesn’t work? How do you build on these activities and keep spaces fresh and inspiring? Offering inclusive and inviting activities embraces the public library standards by providing unique opportunities to know your users and give them what they want.

Presenters:

  • Shane Davis, Library Assistant 3 at Eugene Public Library
  • Martha Sutherland, Library Assistant 3 at Eugene Public Library

Thu 11:00 am - 12:30 pm
Inclusion
Program Session

12:30 pm - 2:00 pm Lunch and Business Meetings

Lunch

Cascade Ballroom

All lunches include a seasonal green salad, bread and butter, iced tea, and a slice of flourless chocolate torte.

Options

  • Ginger glazed vegetables over brown rice with blistered charred green onion. (Vegan, Gluten Free)
  • Pan seared chicken breast with a mushroom jus and served with seasonal vegetables.

Thu 12:30 pm - 2:00 pm
All Together

2:00 pm - 3:00 pm Program Sessions 2

Building Community Through Book Clubs

Davina Morgan-Witts

This program will explore actionable insights from BookBrowse’s 2019 report, "The Inner Lives of Book Clubs", based on two surveys of more than 5,000 book club members. Topics will include: How the world of book groups is much broader than most perceive it to be; the factors that most successful groups have in common; what book clubs look for in their books; what people want from a book group, and how well-placed public libraries are to meet this need.

We will also look at how to run multiple, diverse book clubs without exhausting staff by partnering with the community; how to create an inclusive and welcoming environment, and to proactively manage conflict if necessary. The program is relevant to librarians whether running book groups or providing readers’ advisory to those in groups. All attendees will receive a free PDF of the full 60-page report. More about the report at https://bookbrowse.com/innerlives

Presenter:

  • Davina Morgan-Witts, Publisher, BookBrowse

Thu 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
Program Session

Core Voices: Infusing Indigenous Perspectives Across the Collection

Ginny Norris Blackson

In 2017, the Oregon State Legislature passed Senate Bill 13 directing the Oregon Department of Education to create a K-12 Tribal History Shared History curriculum. This new curriculum provides both collection development challenges and opportunities all types of libraries. Academic libraries that support teacher training can have a profound impact by including outstanding materials from indigenous perspectives in their collection. School librarians can also support the curriculum by collection grade appropriate resources from indigenous perspectives. Public librarians can also support the curriculum by providing resources for all age groups, including the homeschooling community.

The presentation will provide information on the efforts to support Washington State’s Since Time Immemorial Tribal Sovereignty curriculum and how these efforts can help support Oregon’s curriculum. Attendees will learn about tools to build outstanding collections that include indigenous perspectives. The session will explore ways to identify and evaluate Native American and Alaska Native resources.

Blackson will also share her experience as the 2016 Smithsonian Libraries’ Neville-Pribram Mid-Career Educators Award recipient. The award provided the opportunity to conduct research at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian and Vine Deloria Jr. Library located in Washington, DC.

Presenter:

  • Ginny Norris Blackson, Director of Libraries and Media Services, Linfield College

Thu 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
Diversity
Program Session

Creating a Makerspace for Everyone

Theresa Misenti

There are many decisions to make when developing a makerspace, whether you are planning a large room or a small cart. Instead of focusing on the equipment and materials for your space, we will talk about serving the people that will be using it. Is your space available for use for all members of your community? Are there age restrictions? What are the limitations for people who are differently-abled?

In "Creating a Makerspace for Everyone", you will learn about Universal Design principles that can be used as a framework for your makerspace (and any space in your library). We’ll talk about the importance of providing informal lifelong learning programs to the community, and how to offer these experiences in a safe and user-friendly way. We will discuss how to make your space accessible to people of various ages, abilities, and learning differences, regardless of socioeconomic status.

The Hillsboro Public Library identified barriers when looking at the library policy through an equity lens. By adjusting some policy language, the space is now more accessible for everyone. You will leave this session with a better understanding of how to provide a makerspace experience to a diverse community.

Presenter:

  • Theresa Misenti, Hillsboro Public Library

Thu 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
Inclusion
Program Session

Critical Art of Feedback

Lori Wamsley, Liisa Sjoblom

Giving and receiving feedback in the workplace can be hard to do; interacting with a colleague, supervisor, or employee, can quickly and inadvertently result in negative feelings or behaviors if feedback is provided without appropriate context or relevant examples. However, feedback can be empowering and supportive when done constructively and thoughtfully.

In this session, the presenters will interactively engage the participants in how to develop a workplace environment that encourages the use of constructive feedback and provide participants with specific ways to engage in constructive feedback with their colleagues, supervisors, and employees.

Presenters:

  • Lori Wamsley, Faculty Librarian, Mt. Hood Community College
  • Liisa Sjoblom, Community Librarian, Deschutes Public Library

Thu 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
Program Session

Documenting History: Inclusion, Memory and Community

Hannah Leah Crummé, Everett Carter

Who built Portland? What cultural moments do our neighborhoods reflect? What is the history of the city and where is it recorded? Is it complete?

Starting from these questions, this panel begins from the understanding that the history recorded by most archives reflects the people in power. Working backwards, we ask how this can be corrected, to make sure that libraries and archives across Oregon instead record a history that reflects the diverse makeup of the state. We examine case studies from libraries who have worked to build community collections and consider their successes, challenges, and failures. We explore what has been left undocumented and which eras, groups, and individuals have been overlooked by historians until now. Finally, we examine the work left to do, and consider how we can begin to expand and correct the record.

Presenters:

  • Hannah Leah Crummé, Head of Special Collections and College Archivist, Lewis & Clark College
  • Everett Carter, Special Collections Librarian, Lewis & Clark College

Thu 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
Diversity
Program Session

Restructured, Redesigned: Ready or Not for the New RDA Toolkit

Lori Robare, Lori Van Deman

The RDA Toolkit has been restructured to implement the IFLA Library Reference Model (LRM) and redesigned with new features to improve the user experience. Available in Beta since June 2018 and expected to be finalized in early 2020, the new Toolkit will incorporate new concepts and terminology, such as the use of application profiles and a relationship matrix.

This presentation will provide an overview of the features and challenges of the new RDA Toolkit and plans for training and implementation, with an emphasis on how catalogers’ decisions will be guided by policy statements and application profiles. The session will also address alternative options for libraries that can’t afford the RDA subscription or the training to get their staff up to speed on the changes. Workarounds, alternative cataloging guidelines, and options for budget-friendly future developments will be discussed.

Presenters:

  • Lori Robare, Monographic Team Leader, University of Oregon Libraries
  • Lori Van Deman, Head of Technical Services for Cedar Mill & Bethany Community Libraries

Thu 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
Program Session

We're Not Exempt: Challenging Oppressive Power Dynamics in Libraries

Rodrigo Gaspar-Barajas, Alice MacGougan

Why is it that libraries, with their core principles of democracy and diversity, are often guilty of practicing and reinforcing some of American society’s most harmful power dynamics?

Whether it’s the elevation of men over women, cis over trans, heterosexuality over L.G.B.T.Q.I.A.+, white over people of color, urban over rural, or the English language over all other languages, libraries can, in their internal practices and the delivery of their programs and services, act against the very tenets they mean to uphold.

Let’s talk about it. And let’s share how some of us have navigated these challenging waters and together work toward some solutions we can begin to put into practice when we all get back to our libraries.

Presenters:

  • Rodrigo Gaspar-Barajas, Latino Services Coordinator, Deschutes County Library
  • Alice MacGougan, Adult Services Librarian, Salem Public Library

Thu 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
Equity
Program Session

3:00 pm - 3:30 pm Exhibits Break

Exhibits Break

Refreshments

  • Pepsi products

Thu 3:00 pm - 3:30 pm
All Together

3:30 pm - 5:00 pm Program Sessions 3

A Glimpse into OLA's Past: The 50th Anniversary Slide Show

Ray Zill

Grab some popcorn and come view OLA's 50th anniversary slideshow! Learn about its creation, history, and the digitization process!

The original slideshow, produced by Richard C. Forcier of Western Oregon State College, was presented at the Oregon Library Association conference held on March 29, 1990, to celebrate the 50th anniversary of OLA. The presentation provides a unique look at the formation of OLA and the historical events surrounding OLA's development. The 35mm slides and audiocassette recording was digitized by Ray Zill in 2018, with help from the State Library of Oregon and the Digital Production Lab at Willamette University.

This presentation will comprise of a showing of the digitized slideshow presentation, a discussion of the notes and history surrounding its development, and a look at how it was digitized.

Presenter:

  • Ray Zill, Electronic Resources Librarian at The Evergreen State College

Thu 3:30 pm - 5:00 pm
Program Session

Accessibility from the Ground Up: Lessons from Our First Year Working Towards Accessibility

Laura Eiford, Rachel Arkoosh, Josie Ragolia

Pacific University Libraries started a group to investigate accessibility in 2019. We want to share our experiences from our first year of accessibility work on library facilities, services, systems, and collections. We used our varied experience in collections, student success, and systems to progress with limited resources, time, and accessibility expertise. Our first year was spent getting an overview of all the accessibility regulations and best practices in order to figure out what would be appropriate for our institution.

Pacific University enrolls about 4,000 students with locations in Forest Grove, Hillsboro, Eugene, and Woodburn, Oregon including a liberal arts undergraduate program and graduate professional schools. We hope to share our successes and failures so that other small libraries can start their own accessibility work.

Presenters:

  • Laura Eiford, Systems & Applications Librarian, Pacific University
  • Rachel Arkoosh, Collection Librarian, Pacific University
  • Josie Ragolia, Student Success Librarian, Pacific University

Thu 3:30 pm - 5:00 pm
Inclusion
Program Session

Beyond Borders: Decolonizing Your Library with Indigenous Canadian Resources and Children's Lit

Kyla Sweet

Learn how Canadian publishers, educators and libraries are decolonizing their curriculum and library spaces. Discover resources from and about North American indigenous peoples--First Nations, Inuit, and Métis--to enhance your library and institution. Receive evaluation tools and examples of authentic Indigenous resources and thoughtfully selected picture books.

Presenter:

  • Kyla Sweet, Education and Curriculum Outreach K-12, Canada House @ Western Washington University

Thu 3:30 pm - 5:00 pm
Diversity
Program Session

Child & Youth Development

Greta Bergquist, Danielle Jones

In order to work effectively with and advocate for all youth, library staff need a basic understanding of how youth develop, their needs and their assets. This workshop summarizes key child and youth development research and focuses on how to create inclusive and equitable programs that are appropriate for a diverse set youth you work with.

Presenters:

  • Greta Bergquist, Youth Services Consultant, State Library of Oregon
  • Danielle Jones, Youth and Teen Librarian, Multnomah County Library

Thu 3:30 pm - 5:00 pm
Program Session

Everybody Has a Story: Start a Storytelling Program at Your Library

Blaine Ross, Anne LaVallee

Everybody walking through the front doors of your library has a story to tell. With the proper encouragement and setting, you can persuade people to share their stories with a larger audience.

Technology and the fast paced world we live in continue to shrink our cultural and physical spaces bringing us in closer proximity to one another. This can expose us to new philosophies and ideas, but it can also generate anxiety and friction. Technology, the internet, and social media offer the promise of bringing people together, but these tools can also be isolating. Storytelling offers a way to explore wide-ranging themes in a friendly equitable environment. The library is the perfect public forum for this oldest of art forms.

Our presentation will help you design, build, and promote a recurring program that brings people together to share their true personal experiences in a friendly non-judgmental environment. Help people build their confidence to share their stories with others. It’s not Storytime, It’s Storytelling!

Presenters:

  • Blaine Ross, Reference Assistant, Beaverton Library
  • Anne LaVallee, Reference Assistant, Beaverton Library

Thu 3:30 pm - 5:00 pm
Program Session

Lending the Internet: Bridging the Digital Divide with WiFi Hotspots

Ellie Avis, Eric Molinsky, Bob Shonbrun

The lack of Internet access is a serious issue facing many Americans, particularly older adults, racial minorities, rural residents, and those with low incomes or low educational attainment. Without the Internet it can be difficult or impossible to apply for jobs, access government forms, complete homework, and communicate with friends and family. Lack of Internet access is a huge barrier to getting out of poverty.

Libraries have accepted the challenge of providing access within their buildings to narrow the digital divide, but we can do more! Learn differing approaches to circulating “Internet-to-go” through WiFi hotspots, including insights about processes, policies, challenges, and more.

Presenters:

  • Ellie Avis, Collection Development Librarian, Josephine Community Library District
  • Eric Molinsky, Digital Services Supervisor, Jackson County Library Services
  • Bob Shonbrun, Library Technical Assistant II, The Dalles/Wasco County Library District

Thu 3:30 pm - 5:00 pm
Program Session

OLA Quarterly: A Conversation about EDI in Context

Kelly McElroy, Erica Tucker

The recent issue of the OLA Quarterly titled “Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion” addressed topics such as implicit racism, intellectual freedom, and white fragility, and multiple lines of conversation about these topics have continued since the issue came out—a sign that, for many librarians and library staff members, these are the most salient concerns of our time.

This session, facilitated by two Oregon Humanities discussion leaders and sponsored by the OLA Board of Directors, is a response to dynamic tensions and areas for growth around issues of equity within OLA. Through a participatory session grounded in understanding different perspectives, we will move toward thinking together about our opportunities going forward.

Oregon Humanities facilitators lead more than 300 community conversations around the state each year—many in partnership with libraries—and orient these conversations toward the vision of an Oregon that invites diverse perspectives, explores challenging questions, and strives for just communities. This conversation will be grounded in voices which have historically been underrepresented and will aim to create positive opportunities for participants to consider history in context. Through conversation, OLA and Oregon Humanities hope to deepen our connections to each other and the world around us.

Presenters:

  • Kelly McElroy, librarian at Oregon State University and facilitator of the “Beyond Fake News” Conversation Project
  • Erica Tucker, equity coordinator at REACH CDC and facilitator of the “Who Are the Deserving Poor” Conversation Project.

Thu 3:30 pm - 5:00 pm
Diversity, Equity
Program Session

5:00 pm - 6:00 pm All-Conference Reception

All Conference Reception

Exhibits Hall

Refreshments

  • English Cucumber
  • Pinwheel Sandwiches
  • Goat Cheese and Squash Tartlets
  • Spring Rolls
  • House Bar

Thu 5:00 pm - 6:00 pm
All Together

6:00 pm - 8:00 pm Dinner Events

DIGOR Business Meeting/Gathering

This meeting will take place at Joolz, 916 NW Wall St.

Thu 6:00 pm - 8:00 pm
Meeting

Friday May 1, 2020

7:30 am - 8:30 am Business Meetings

Library Instruction Round Table Meeting

Fri 7:30 am - 8:30 am
Meeting

New Members Round Table Meeting

Fri 7:30 am - 8:30 am
Meeting

Reference & Legal Reference Round Tables Meeting

Fri 7:30 am - 8:30 am
Meeting

REFORMA Oregon Meeting

Fri 7:30 am - 8:30 am
Meeting

Support Staff Division Meeting

Fri 7:30 am - 8:30 am
Meeting

8:30 am - 10:00 am Program Sessions 1

Building Staff ED&I Competence

Tracey Letmate

Do you struggle with ideas for how to provide equity, diversity and inclusion (ED&I) training for your staff? Join the Staff Training Round Table during this session to learn about different strategies for providing ED&I training for staff. Panelists will represent both public and academic libraries. Discussions will include how staff work internally with each other, as well as externally with our patrons and community. Time will be given for Q&A, so bring your questions and challenges and learn from others.

By the end of the session, attendees will:

  • Learn about different approaches for EDI training
  • Hear about the challenges faced with implementation
  • Take away ideas for how to provide training at your library

Facilitator:

  • Tracey Letmate, Manager Learning and Oganizational Development, Multnomah County Library

Fri 8:30 am - 10:00 am
Diversity, Equity, Inclusion
Program Session

From Weeds to Gardens: Withdrawn Books + Local Partnerships = Serving Your Community Where They Are

Victoria Campbell, Catherine Jasper, Korie Jones Burekle, Marcia Hale, Carson Mischel

Learn how public libraries have partnered to give withdrawn books new life by making them available in our communities. Library panelists will discuss partnerships with pediatricians, clinics, transit centers, Head Starts, foodbanks, and neighborhood parks.

If you’ve ever dreamed of having free books available in your local airport or doctor’s office, or wondered if the library could sponsor a Tiny Library Branch in a park, this is the session for you! Our panelists will talk about details from identifying books, to cultivating partnerships, to setting up maintenance plans to ensure long-term success.

Panelists:

  • Victoria Campbell, Youth Service Manager, Beaverton City Library
  • Catherine Jasper, Collection Development Librarian, Deschutes Public Library
  • Korie Jones Buerkle, Children’s Librarian, Newberg Public Library
  • Marcia Hale, Volunteer Engagment, Hillsboro Public Library
  • Carson Mischel, Youth Services Senior Librarian, Beaverton City Library

Fri 8:30 am - 10:00 am
Program Session

Get Your Wonk On: Writing Patron-Friendly and Effective Library Policies

Ginny Blackson, Eric Blaine, Buzzy Nielsen, Teresa Stover

Do your library policies sound like something from a Kafka novel? Or maybe they're a laundry list of all the crazy things patrons have done in your library?

Come learn from your colleagues on how to write policies that are easily understood, flexible, and patron-friendly while still giving you the tools you need to best carry out your library's mission. Librarians from public, school, and academic libraries--as well as a bonafide real-life lawyer!--will speak to their experiences and philosophies of policy writing and presenting them to your administration and governing bodies.

Presenters:

  • Ginny Blackson
  • Eric Blaine
  • Buzzy Nielsen
  • Teresa Stover

Fri 8:30 am - 10:00 am
Program Session

Great Teen Advisory Groups

Sonja Somerville, Mark Richardson, Rachel Timmons

Teens with a heart for service can be a tremendous asset to your library. Whether you call it a Teen Advisory Board or Teen Action Group or by another name, allowing teens to have a voice, develop their skills, and actively support your library is valuable to you and to them.

Come gather ideas for how to form a teen group or perk up an existing program from librarians who coordinate thriving groups at their libraries. We’ll also share great stories and best practices culled from a variety of libraries – from rural to urban – because there is definitely more than one way to form and/or run a highly successful teen board. Bring your ideas to share during small and large group discussion aimed at sending you back to your library ready to harness the energy of enthusiastic teens.

Presenters:

  • Sonja Somerville, Teen Services Senior Librarian, Salem Public Library
  • Mark Richardson, Young Adult and Reference Librarian, Cedar Mill Library
  • Rachel Timmons, Teen Services Librarian, Hood River County Library

Fri 8:30 am - 10:00 am
Program Session

Short Books for Big Ideas: Building and Using a Children's Literature Equity Collection

Catherine Finney, Amy Howell, Tina Hovekamp

Why build an equity-focused children’s literature collection for your academic, professional, or school library? What are some resources for building a children’s literature collection that reflects a rich diversity of world experiences? How might instructors and librarians use culturally responsive children’s literature to teach “grown up” concepts in a college, university, or adult professional education environment?

Central Oregon Community College librarians and faculty will lead a dynamic panel discussion based on their experience developing and using the Children’s Literature Equity & Resource Center (CLERC) at COCC’s Barber Library. Attendees can expect to achieve the following outcomes in this thought provoking and practical session:

  • Increased understanding of equity-focused children’s literature.
  • Awareness of collection development tools for equity-focused children’s literature.
  • An understanding of strategies for teaching cultural and emotional literacy using children’s books in young adult and professional learning environments.
  • Ideas for interdepartmental collaboration in which shared commitments and resources drive meaningful practices to benefit the campus and broader community.

Presenters:

  • Catherine Finney - Professor, COCC Collection Development and Acquisitions Librarian
  • Amy Howell - Professor, COCC Early Childhood Education
  • Tina Hovekamp, COCC Barber Library Director

Fri 8:30 am - 10:00 am
Equity
Program Session

Sign Language Beginner Basics for Early Literacy, Inclusion, and Fun!

Dawn Babb Prochovnic

School-aged kids view American Sign Language/ASL as a secret code to unlock, preschoolers embrace signing with the same enthusiasm reserved for treasured finger plays, and many babies born today will learn to sign before they can talk.

In this fast-paced workshop, participants will learn the benefits and ease of incorporating key ASL signs into activities and interactions with children of all ages/abilities, with special emphasis on practical techniques that support routine transitions, guide positive behavior, and enrich literacy/early literacy experiences. Participants will also gain an understanding of how ASL can be applied as a tool to introduce and discuss diversity and inclusion and to create an opportunity for shared understanding when there are multiple spoken languages in the learning community.

Facilitated by children’s author and early literacy consultant, Dawn Babb Prochovnic, MA. For more information about Dawn and her work, visit www.dawnprochovnic.com.

Presenter:

  • Dawn Prochovnic, MA, Children's Author and Founder of SmallTalk Learning

Fri 8:30 am - 10:00 am
Inclusion
Program Session

The Power of Being Seen

Jessica Amascual

In an industry that is historically homogenous, the Oregon Library Association aims to right its wrongs and properly hold an intersectional affinity space for folks that identify as belonging to nondominant culture groups. In this facilitated conversation, participants will have the opportunity to be seen as they are, identify themselves with pride in a safe space, discuss issues they’ve experienced, and contribute to an action item list that will be discussed with the Oregon Library Association.

This space is open to BIPOC (black, indigenous, and people of color), LGBTQIA+, disabled folks, Jews and Muslims, Palestinians, as well as migrants and refugees.

Presenter:

  • Jessica Amascual, Embrace Bend

Fri 8:30 am - 10:00 am
Diversity, Equity
Program Session

10:00 am - 11:00 am Exhibits and Poster Session

Exhibits Break

Exhibits Hall

Refreshments

  • Bagels with cream cheese
  • Assorted pastries
  • Coffee and tea

Fri 10:00 am - 11:00 am
All Together

Poster Session

Exhibits Hall

Library professionals and researchers will display posters and discuss their work in the Exhibits Hall.

Fri 10:00 am - 11:00 am
All Together

11:00 am - 12:30 pm Program Sessions 2

Navigating the World of Book Publishing

Kim Cooper Findling

The good news is that there are more ways to publish a book in today’s world than ever before in history. But how do you navigate the book publishing territory? Traditional, small press, independent, self-publishing, regional, boutique, scholarly, academic—what do these terms mean? And which one is right for you?

In this workshop, author and publisher Kim Cooper Findling will clarify the puzzling waters of publishing. Learn how to determine which publishing path is best for you and your project, and how to guide your book to its best finish line.

Presenter:

  • Kim Cooper Findling, Author and Publisher, Dancing Moon Press

Fri 11:00 am - 12:30 pm
Program Session

Shutting Down Microaggressions

Sinclaire St. Clair, Kit Lorelied

Microaggressions happen. How you handle them can make the difference between fostering a welcoming place for patrons and workers or a space that is dominated by one thought, idea, or culture. Learn some techniques to handle microaggresions that stop them in their tracks and maybe even provide opportunities for growth.

Presenters:

  • Sinclair St. Claire, Public Services Assistant, Tualatin Public Library
  • Kit Lorelied, Public Services Assistant, Tualatin Public Library

Fri 11:00 am - 12:30 pm
Diversity, Equity
Program Session

Stark Raving OYAN: Booktalks for the 2020 Book Rave and 2019 Graphic Rave

Sonja Somerville, Bobbye Hernandez, Heather Sears

Snappy, exciting booktalks introduce the most recent “best of” suggestions for young adult books and graphic novels, as collected and published annually by members of the Oregon Young Adult Network (OYAN). Graphic Rave, released annually in the fall, highlights excellent graphic novel selections for young adult readers. Book Rave, highlighting the best of fiction and non-fiction for young adults, is prepared in the spring and kept a deep, dark secret until the reveal at the Oregon Library Association’s conference!

This session highlights why you might want to buy and suggest these books to teens and adults who read YA in your library–and also read them yourself. Print copies of both lists will be available take back to your library. Links to PDFs online allow you to print and share more as needed. OYAN booktalkers will also include some newer titles to watch for from early to mid-2020.

Presenters:

  • Sonja Somerville, Teen Services Senior Librarian, Salem Public Library
  • Bobbye Hernandez, Bilingual Spanish Youth Librarian, Multnomah County Library
  • Heather Sears, Teen Librarian, Eugene Public Library

Fri 11:00 am - 12:30 pm
Program Session

Teen Programs 201: The Fake Blood Is In the Mail

Rachel Timmons, Susan Davis

Teen programs can be both a joy and a challenge. Most librarians have an escape room kit, some trivia or some old favorites programs. Here we explore what else can be done with the tools and themes that might be a new twist or the next level for programs. We will explore the benefits and opportunities for our teen patrons as we engage them in different situations and explore how to take teen ideas and make a program out of them.

New to programming or an old hand, come share ideas, learn new directions, tricks to balancing ambition with reality, and what it takes to mail order fake blood.

Presenters:

  • Rachel Timmons, Teen Librarian Hood River Library
  • Susan Davis, Youth Service Librarian Joshephine Community Library

Fri 11:00 am - 12:30 pm
Program Session

The View from Olumo Rock: Supporting Institutional Repository Development in Abeokuta, Nigeria

Richard Sapon-White, Michael Boock

How does one promote open access and institutional repositories in a country where they are still relatively novel? Can you communicate effectively about library issues in a place where everyone speaks English as a second language? Do you eat boli with a fork or just use your fingers? The answers to these questions and more are the focus of this informative session on academic library development in Africa’s most populous country.

In November, 2019, Michael Boock and Richard Sapon-White spent two weeks at OSU’s sister library at the Federal University of Agriculture, Abeokuta, Nigeria, meeting with colleagues, consulting on setting up their institutional repository, and presenting at two conferences. They will also provide their up-close and personal experiences with Nigerian music, food, and popular culture–including their hike up historic Olumo Rock, an ancient religious site in the center of Abeokuta. Come hear the highlights of their visit and learn the benefits of establishing a sister library relationship of your own!

Presenters:

  • Richard Sapon-White
  • Michael Boock

Fri 11:00 am - 12:30 pm
Program Session

Uplifting Children's Social Identities during Storytimes

Thalia Stafford, Hadiyah Miller

This presentation will introduce participants to the four goals of anti-bias education, which will help promote children's social identities and social justice issues during storytimes through intentional book selection and the use of activities that encourage self awareness.

Educators, librarians and caregivers will understand the developmental progression for race, class, abilities, gender, family composition, language and culture of young children ages 0 to 6. We will also discuss the role of adult self-reflection so that we can all explore and focused on social justice issues and evaluations of learning experiences during storytime.

Presenters:

  • Thalia Stafford, Multnomah County Library Youth Librarian, Black Cultural Library Advocate
  • Hadiyah Miller, Child Care Resource and Referral of Multnomah County, Early Childhood Consultant

Fri 11:00 am - 12:30 pm
Diversity, Equity, Inclusion
Program Session

Zen and the Art of Legal Reference: Answering the Question without Answering the Question

Sue Ludington, Lee Van Duzer

“How can I get guardianship of my grandson?”

“My landlord is trying to evict me. What should I do?”

“Where can I find the form to add someone else to my deed?”

Legal reference questions come in all shapes and sizes, from patrons who have wildly diverse educational backgrounds, socio-economic resources, and mental/emotional faculties. How can the non-law specialist best respond to these “legal problem” questions from such a varied (yet needy) audience in a thoughtful and meaningful way?

Led by two seasoned Oregon county law librarians, this session will dive into the array of legal reference situations that we encounter daily with our patrons; from there, we’ll share recommended strategies for offering assistance on a wide-range of legal conundrums. From learning the difference between legal advice versus legal information, to hearing valuable tips and specific dos and don’ts, to developing appropriate “scripts” and phrases that effectively manage patron expectations, attendees will emerge feeling empowered and confident in their ability to provide knowledgeable, equitable legal information to all library users.

Presenters:

  • Sue Ludington, Law Librarian, Lane County Law Library
  • Lee Van Duzer, Law Librarian, Washington County Law Library

Fri 11:00 am - 12:30 pm
Program Session

12:30 pm - 2:00 pm Awards Lunch

Awards Lunch

Cascade Ballroom

All lunches include a seasonal green salad, bread and butter, iced tea, and a cookie or brownie.

Options

  • Snap pea and tofu soba noodles with a shitake mushroom broth. (Vegan, Gluten Free)
  • Baked penne with Italian sausage, spinach, roasted tomato sauce, fresh mozzarella and parmigiano reggiano.

Fri 12:30 pm - 2:00 pm
All Together

2:00 pm - 3:00 pm Program Sessions 3

Accidental Spanish Language Cataloger

Amy Mihelich, Lisa Hauner. Mayra Capistran

As public and school libraries around the state build their Spanish-language collections, this can present a new challenge for the library staff responsible for cataloging these materials. We have all felt the initial panic when facing a foreign language cataloging dilemma: "But wait! I'm not a Spanish-fluent cataloger!"

This session will ease those fears and encourage catalogers of entry and moderate levels to be able to catalog in Spanish as readily as in English. The presenters will share tips, tricks, tools and backs to help "accidental" Spanish-language catalogers find, edit, and create catalog records that will make these materials as accessible as possible to searching patrons. We will provide you with the necessary resources to add and fill in industry standard subject and genre headings, as well as the ability to include summaries and item descriptions for your Spanish reading patrons and students.

Presenters:

  • Amy Mihelich
  • Lisa Hauner
  • Mayra Capistran

Fri 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
Program Session

DEI @ BCL

Glenn Ferdman, Dean Allsopp, Araceli Acosta

This presentation will discuss the Diversity, Equity and Inclusion initiatives implemented at the Beaverton City Library during the past two years. It will focus on the following three initiatives: The Cultural Awareness Training Team, DEI Toolkit and the DEI work of the library Management Team.

Presenters:

  • Glenn Ferdman, Director, Beaverton City Library
  • Dean Allsopp, former PSU Hatfield Summer Fellow and current MPA student at the University of WA
  • Araceli Acosta, Beaverton City Library Youth Services Outreach Specialist

Fri 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
Diversity, Equity, Inclusion
Program Session

Exploring Wikidata and Its Potential Use for Library Data

Lori Robare

Wikidata is a knowledge base of structured, open linked data – multilingual and collaboratively edited. It supports Wikipedia and other Wikimedia Foundation projects and serves as a linking hub for identifiers (from the Library of Congress, ORCID, ISNI, etc.). As libraries begin to transition from MARC-based bibliographic data to linked data and from authority control to identity management, Wikidata provides interesting opportunities for collaboration that may enrich Wikidata and benefit library discovery.

This session will describe a sabbatical project to explore the use of Wikidata as an approach to identity management, raise the profile of people and organizations important to Oregon (in particular, people from underrepresented groups) by creating structured data about them and their works in Wikidata, and explore the feasibility of using Wikidata as a platform for publishing and linking library authority data.

Presenter:

  • Lori Robare, Monographic Team Leader, University of Oregon Libraries

Fri 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
Program Session

New Diverse Picture Books to Add to Your Storytime

Rita King

Our communities are becoming more multiracial and diverse throughout the country. Our library storytimes can lead the way by providing great new diverse picture books that not only reflect the lives of the kids in our communities, but also the wider world they may not yet know. Learn about some great new 2020 picture books you can add to your storytime to help!

Presenter:

  • Rita King, Children's and Teen Services Manager, Baker and Taylor

Fri 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
Diversity
Program Session

Talking About the Taboo: Programs for Older Adults

Beth Gilbert, Kera Magarill

Demographics are shifting creating an increased need for services for older adults. By 2030, the population of people over the age of 65 will double in the United States.

To address the needs and interests of our aging population, Beaverton City Library partnered with Washington County Disability, Aging and Veteran Services to provide unique community-building programs. These programs focus on traditionally taboo topics such as death and dying, sexuality, drug use and mental health. In providing a safe space to discuss and explore these difficult topics, Beaverton City Library has created the opportunity for deep connections within the older adult community.

One particularly successful series of programming is Death Café, which is a group-directed discussion on the philosophical and practical aspects of death and dying. Participants have described Death Café as “a place to be open, honest and vulnerable about death.” Conversations about death are easier once participants talk about it in the non-judgmental environment of Death Café.

This presentation will demonstrate the steps to a successful partnership and provide details on the special programming happening at Beaverton City Library.

Presenters:

  • Beth Gilbert, Adult Services Librarian, Beaverton City Library
  • Kera Magarill, Older Adult Behavioral Health Specialist, Washington County Disability, Aging and Veteran Services

Fri 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
Program Session

Using the Census to Promote Awareness of Civics and Statistics among Kids

Heidi Crawford

The 2020 Census offers a unique opportunity to talk to kids about civics and statistical concepts. The Census Bureau offers an array of ideas and resources for activities for kids to help connect this important civic event to what they need to be media-literate consumers of information.

This presentation will highlight the U.S. Census Bureau’s Statistics in Schools (SIS) program, which is a free program providing kid-friendly data on a variety of topics. Participants will leave the session equipped with tools and activities to promote civic engagement, understanding of statistical data, and appreciation for their community’s diversity.

Presenter:

  • Heidi Crawford, Statistics in Schools Liaison, U.S. Census Bureau

Fri 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
Program Session

Young Teen Collections: The Why and How of Charting this Unknown Together

Victoria Campbell, Barratt Miller, Rebecca Mayer, Sandy Carson-FitzGerald

When you read a fantastic Grades 5-8 review in School Library Journal, what collection does that book go in to at your library? Several libraries have created Young Teen collections to meet the need of readers stuck in the middle between children’s and Young Adult.

Come hear why we are passionate about these new collections from 3 different libraries with 3 different approaches. We will share options and steps so you can create a Young Teen collection at your library. These collections mostly include fiction and graphic novels but also include audiobooks, DVDs, and games.

Presenters:

  • Victoria Campbell, Youth Services Manager, Beaverton City Library
  • Barratt Miller, Youth Services Librarian, Oregon City Public Library
  • Rebecca Mayer, Teen/Tween Librarian, West Linn Public Library
  • Sandy Carson-FitzGerald, Children’s Librarian, Beaverton City Library

Fri 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
Program Session

3:00 pm - 3:30 pm Exhibits Break

Exhibits Break

Exhibits Hall

Refreshments

  • Pepsi products

Fri 3:00 pm - 3:30 pm
All Together

3:30 pm - 5:00 pm Program Sessions 4

Breaking Boundaries: Women's Voices That Establish Place and Position

Sisters C

Through much of history, western cultural traditions conditioned women to be compliant and give way. Society labeled women who spoke out, who were independent of male partners, who were not conventionally feminine, who were not domestic goddesses.

This session describes the role and value of university and historical archives in preserving women’s voices with a particular focus on the University of Oregon collections and follows with two case studies that describe women who intentionally chose paths of their own design, who fulfilled their desires and ambitions in ways that were and are unconventional. A panel of archivist-historians explore the primary and secondary resources available in selected Oregon archival collections that amplify and extend women’s voices and the research that brings the voices of these women into the public space for all to hear.

Panelists:

  • Maureen Flanagan Battistella, MLS, Southern Oregon University Sociology/Anthropology
  • Linda Long, MLS, MA, Manuscripts Librarian, University of Oregon Special Collections and University Archives
  • Mary Gently, Southern Oregon University History and Gender, Sexuality and Women's Studies

Fri 3:30 pm - 5:00 pm
Program Session

Diversity in Graphic Novels

Taylor Worley, Angela Ocana, Mark Richardson

What do you think of when you think of Graphic Novels? Out of this world story-telling? Avant-Gard art work? International images and topics of every variety? What about diversity?

Graphic novels offer diversity in many ways such as, age, race, ability, and gender identity. The engaging format makes graphic novels an ideal way to share and access diversity and diverse topics. So, let’s talk about it!

The expert panel members will discuss topics of diversity in graphic novels such as characters, themes, selection, availability, resources, access and everything in-between. Graphic novels are composed all over the world and from all kinds of fascinating minds. They are full of new and exciting examples of diversity content at every turn. Whether you are a graphic novel fan or new to graphic novels let’s learn more about using them to provide diversity content to our communities with confidence.

Presenters:

  • Taylor Worley, Youth Services Librarian, Springfield Public Library (Oregon)
  • Angela Ocana, Young Adult Librarian, Eugene Public Library
  • Mark Richardson Young Adult and Reference Librarian at Cedar Mill Library

Fri 3:30 pm - 5:00 pm
Diversity
Program Session

How Low Can You Go? Reducing Barriers to Access

Greta Bergquist, Ross Fuqua, Laura Kimberly, Kristin Williams

As more and more libraries eliminate fines, this path toward improving social equity can still be a difficult road for many libraries and communities. Strong resistance to eliminating fines can come from all directions and for a variety of reasons.

This panel, made of up of library directors from smaller Oregon communities, will share their experiences and strategies for bringing stakeholders along for the ride. This session will be framed around how to anticipate the typical counter arguments against removing fines, and using data, examples, and other resources to draw support. Panelists will also discuss how to use alternative strategies to achieving better social equity around fines, when eliminating fines altogether is not a readily available option.

Panelists:

  • Greta Bergquist, Youth Services Consultant, State Library of Oregon
  • Ross Fuqua, Data & Federal Programs Consultant, State Library of Oregon
  • Laura Kimberly, Library Director, Newport Public Library
  • Kristin Williams, Library Director, Athena Public Library

Fri 3:30 pm - 5:00 pm
Equity
Program Session

Legislators are People, Too: Advocating to your Elected Officials

Amanda Dalton, Buzzy Nielsen

Does the thought of talking to an elected officials make your blood run cold? It’s not as scary as it sounds!

Panelists, including OLA’s lobbyist and an actual state legislator, will teach your practical techniques on advocating to elected officials about library issues at the local, state, and federal levels. Whether you’re trying to get more library funding locally or championing rural broadband federally, learning how to build relationships with lawmakers will help your cause.

Presenters:

  • Amanda Dalton
  • Buzzy Nielsen

Fri 3:30 pm - 5:00 pm
Program Session

Power of Adult Programming: Craft Night

Cecili Longhorn, Debbie Baros

It’s not JUST a craft night! It starts as a fun time to craft and soon you discover it is so much more. Discover how your adult craft nights can build connections, confidence and people discover their smile again.

Presenters:

  • Cecili Longhorn
  • Debbie Baros

Fri 3:30 pm - 5:00 pm
Program Session

Read Me a Story! Outreach, Inmates, and Early Literacy

Jennifer Croft, Erin McCusker

Read Me a Story! is an early literacy program designed to reach the children of those incarcerated in Oregon prisons. We meet with and train inmates, then do video recordings of them reading a book they chose from our pre-selected list to their children. Their children then get that book and the recording in a care package in the mail. Along with the goodies is early literacy information for their caregiver.

The results of this program have been remarkable! Feedback I've gotten says the children are reading, and being read to much more often than before they participated in the program. Positive vibes spread around the prison dorms too because inmates are practicing reading through the stories with other prisoners. There is so much good in this program that I'd love to see it in every Oregon prison. My hope is that by presenting at OLA, it will inspire others to join us and make Read Me a Story! work for them.

Presenters:

  • Jennifer Croft, ESO Director, Coos County Library Service District
  • Erin McCusker, District Director, Umatilla County Special Library District

Fri 3:30 pm - 5:00 pm
Equity
Program Session

Shake It Up! A Fearless Guide to Changing Your Summer Reading Program

April Spisak

Summer Reading is a library staple, and when it seems like it is working, it's easy to just keep going with the known formula. However, this can leave your staff and patrons feeling uninspired, and leave your statistics flat year after year (if not declining). It can also block opportunities for inclusion, accessibility, and true diversity if your program isn't growing and evolving.

After addressing the common barriers to change, we’ll spend the rest of this workshop exploring what can be changed, how to implement changes in thoughtful ways that support your goals, and what one might expect to see out of the effort. Make your patrons wonder what’s coming next! Brainstorm outreach locations that will find folks who have never participated in SRP! Find ways to implement odd and wonderful patron requests! Boldly dive into creatively challenging programs! Impress the world with your unique reading logs! Or, if that all sounds like a bit much, at least come and get some practical tips about SRP changes, including small ones, that you can implement quickly and with quantifiable (and anecdotal) success.

Presenter:

  • April Spisak, Head of Youth Services, Albany Public Library

Fri 3:30 pm - 5:00 pm
Program Session

6:00 pm - 9:00 pm All-Conference Banquet

President's Banquet

Exhibits Hall

OLA President Elaine Hirsch invites everyone (ticket included with full conference registration) to celebrate OLA’s 80th anniversary with a look back over OLA’s history from the first meeting at Timberline Lodge in 1940 to today as we meet in Bend, Oregon. Special entertainment is on the menu as well.

All dinners include a local green salad, bread and butter, coffee and tea, and chocolate decadence with berries and whipped cream.

Options

  • Portobello Napoleon with a roasted red pepper coulis. Served with seasonal vegetables. (Vegetarian)
  • Prosciutto wrapped chicken with a wild mushroom cream sauce and seasonal vegetables.
  • House Bar

Fri 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
All Together

Saturday May 2, 2020

8:30 am - 10:00 am Program Sessions 1

Counting on Calculators: An Equipment Equity Assessment

Kelly Stormking

How equitable is your equipment collection? Through design thinking, equipment collections can be evaluated to provide equitable access to resources and services with the voice of community.

At Oregon State University’s Valley Library, we collaborated with people across campus to evaluate the accessibility and affordability of our equipment collections. Explore and reflect on how to assess your equipment collection as support staff through this presentation which includes an interactive design thinking activity.

Presenter:

  • Kelly Stormking, Library Technician II, Oregon State University

Sat 8:30 am - 10:00 am
Inclusion
Program Session

Fostering Readers: Fun Research-Based Literacy Programs for K-3rd Grade

Katie Anderson

Learn about the research-based building blocks of activities that support children in K-3rd grade who are learning to read. Practice using key elements, key strategies, and Fostering Readers resources to plan literacy programs at your library. Start planning your Fostering Readers programs today, during this session!

The Fostering Readers resources are designed to be inclusive. They are flexible for small, medium, and large libraries in rural, suburban, and urban communities. Resources empower monolingual or multilingual English-speaking library staff to include children and families who speak languages other than English in their programs, with specific support for Spanish-speakers. Resources can be used to plan programs for children only or children who attend with their families. (fosteringreaders.weebly.com)

Presenter:

  • Katie Anderson, Youth Services Librarian, Washington County Cooperative Library Services

Sat 8:30 am - 10:00 am
Program Session

Literacy and Justice for All: Library Services to Refugees and Newcomers

Claire Dannenbaum

Following sabbatical research in the Spring 2019, this session will report on a variety of library programs developed for refugees and newcomers in the US, the Netherlands, and Germany.

Through a lens of social justice, the presentation will offer different examples of library programs from a selection of the 11 libraries visited during the project. Using a set of spatial metaphors, we will explore examples of programs that illustrate the library as sanctuary, storehouse, gateway, and bridge. Opportunities to develop literacy, citizenship, integration, and self-expression are just some examples of library programs designed for refugee and newcomer communities.

The session will be relevant to libraries who are already providing programs and services specifically for refugees and newcomers, or would like to develop such programs in the future.

Presenter:

  • Claire Dannenbaum, Librarian, Lane Community College

Sat 8:30 am - 10:00 am
Diversity
Program Session

Making Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion Our Priority: A Staff-Led Approach for Affecting Change

Annie Lewis, Jennifer Studebaker

Perhaps your organization has decided to focus on diversity, equity, and inclusion… but now what?

Join Multnomah County Library’s Early Childhood Services Manager, Annie Lewis, and Youth Services Manager, Jennifer Studebaker, in a discussion about the approach the youth services team at Multnomah County Library is taking. The presentation will focus on internal work to help build an inclusive, equitable work environment so staff are prepared to prioritize equity and inclusion in their work in their community. Jennifer and Annie will highlight the importance of staff-led work, provide examples of activities that you can do with your team, and share resources developed by MCL staff. The approach presented can be adapted to any staff group in the library, and will work best for a team that has embraced inclusion and has done some basic foundational work on why equity matters.

Presenters:

  • Annie Lewis, Early Childhood Services Manager, Multnomah County Library
  • Jennifer Studebaker, Youth Services Manager, Multnomah County Library

Sat 8:30 am - 10:00 am
Diversity, Equity, Inclusion
Program Session

Oregon Reader’s Choice Awards: Games, Trivia, and More!

MacKenzie Ross, Taylor Worley

Whether you are an ORCA (Oregon Reader’s Choice Award) veteran or just learning about the program, we’re here to help you spark a fire in your readers. We’ll begin with a trivia game as a fun reveal of the 2019-2020 ORCA winners and the titles for the 2020-2021 shortlists. Winners can expect prizes!

After the big reveal, we’ll talk logistics and inspiration, providing ideas and resources for creating a successful ORCA program in your school or public library. We’ll also talk about the process of generating the ORCA shortlists, with an emphasis on creating diverse and inclusive reading lists that inspire our readers.

Have questions? We’ll end with a Q&A so you can make sure to leave with all the information you need for a great year.

Presenters:

  • MacKenzie Ross, Youth Services Librarian, Beaverton City Library
  • Taylor Worley, Youth Librarian, Springfield Public Library

Sat 8:30 am - 10:00 am
Program Session

Reducing Barriers for All Libraries: Help! I Need the Library Squad!

Esther Moberg, Brenda Katz, Marianne Coalson

Libraries of all sizes and types throughout the state are in need of small improvements, whether relative to services, programming, communication, technology, collection development or updated spaces to keep up with the demands of what communities need and expect - to stay informed, educated and especially, to stay connected to each other. Sometimes small, targeted improvements can make a world of difference.

The Library Squad is a team of Librarians and consultants, specialists with varying focuses and strengths, available to offer advice and expertise to help with small issues or projects at your library. Let us introduce ourselves and see how we can help.

Presenters:

  • Esther Moberg, current past President of the Oregon Library Association, has over 20 years experience in public, academic, and school libraries. She has managed libraries for over 11 years and is past chair of the Oregon Digital Library Consortium and has served on multiple committees and boards both for OLA and in her community.
  • Brenda Katz, AIA, ALA is a Library Planner and Designer at SERA Architects. 35 years of experience in all types and phases of architecture and interior design, with a specific focus on libraries and learning spaces. Member of the ALA, LLAMA Architecture for Public Libraries Committee.
  • Marianne Coalson has worked in public libraries for 13 years and recently served as Secretary for OLA’s Public Library Division. As Branch Manager of the Bethany Library, she has experience working with staff on finding unique ways in delivering library services and materials for a fast growing population in a very small space.

Sat 8:30 am - 10:00 am
Program Session

Think Diversity, Think Comics

Alicia Tate, Laural Winter, Tasha Forrester Campbell

This Readers’ Advisory session highlights important resources and essential comics creators to help even non-comics-reading staff feel confident helping youth and adults. Presenters will highlight and focus on newer comics that support diversity, equity, and own voices.

Presentation includes: why comics appeal to readers, top comics genres and creators, and how to find comics read-alikes, and will feature how to implement a staff readers' advisory comics lab with this hands-on workshop.

Presenters:

  • Alicia Tate, Teen Librarian, Multnomah County Library
  • Laural Winter, Staff Training Librarian, Multnomah County Library
  • Tasha Forrester Campbell, Youth Librarian, Multnomah County Library

Sat 8:30 am - 10:00 am
Program Session

10:00 am - 11:00 am Exhibits Break

Exhibits Break

Exhibits Hall

Refreshments

  • Assorted bagels with cream cheese
  • Fruit skewers
  • Coffee and tea

Sat 10:00 am - 11:00 am
All Together

11:00 am - 12:30 pm Program Sessions 2

Better Together: Increasing Inclusion through Collaboration

Aja Bettencourt-McCarthy, Deniece Davis

Small rural libraries face unique challenges when working to develop equity, diversity, and inclusion initiatives. During this presentation, the Oregon Tech Library will present strategies for developing successful cross-campus and external collaborations to extend equity, diversity, and inclusion initiatives in academic libraries.

The Oregon Tech librarian and staff efforts to build relationships with campus and community partners including the Student Health, Multicultural Student Services, Campus Life, and the Klamath County Library have taken the library's equity, diversity, and inclusion work from non-existent to recognized both on- and off-campus through programs like the hanging of the flags of the nine registered Oregon Tribes in the library, a library-lead food drive in support of the campus food pantry, and a partnership with diversity, equity, and inclusion campus leaders to integrate diversity, equity, and inclusion components into library's public services student worker training. The program will also include time for participants to engage in small group structured brainstorming to identify potential collaborations at their libraries as well as time for a question and answer session.

Presenters:

  • Aja Bettencourt-McCarthy, Head of Public Services, Oregon Tech Library
  • Deniece Davis, Library Tech 3 Public Services, Oregon Tech Library

Sat 11:00 am - 12:30 pm
Diversity, Equity, Inclusion
Program Session

Contentious Content: Facing Challenges to Programs and Services

Tamara Ottum, Natasha Chitow, Kirsten Brodbeck-Kenney, Steve Silver, Korie Buerkle, Shawn Cunningham

In recent years libraries in Oregon have faced challenges to drag queen story hours, LGBTQIA+ displays and programs, cultural exhibits, and more. Come hear staff from a variety of libraries share their experiences with such challenges and the lessons they have learned. Participate in an open discussion with colleagues about responding to these types of challenges in a fair and equitable manner. Bring your stories and questions!

Moderator:

  • Tamara Ottum, Oregon Intellectual Freedom Clearinghouse Coordinator, State Library of Oregon

Panelists:

  • Natasha Chitow, Head Librarian, Cottage Grove Public Library
  • Kirsten Brodbeck-Kenney, Library Director, Driftwood Public Library
  • Steve Silver, Library Director, Northwest Christian University
  • Korie Buerkle, Finance Chair, Oregon Battle of the Books
  • Shawn Cunningham, Director of Communications and Strategic Initiatives, Multnomah County Library

Sat 11:00 am - 12:30 pm
Program Session

Embargos, Prices, and Platforms, Oh My! Issues in Digital Collections

Kathryn O. Kohl, Emily O'Neal

At the foundation of every library lies the materials and collection both physical and electronic. What would happen if libraries no longer had access to purchase materials in their preferred format to build that foundation?

Over the past year, libraries have been under attack by book publishers and digital platform vendors in a variety of ways, making that “what if” question seeming more like reality. From embargos to price hikes, from lack of archival or perpetual access to a lack of digital platforms for preferred formats, it is becoming more and more difficult for libraries to provide access to content, materials and information.

This session looks at the current state of digital content buying, diving into why this is so cataclysmic to a library’s core including our belief and goal to provide equal and free access to content for all.

Presenters:

  • Kathryn O. Kohl, MSLIS, MA - Manager of LINCC Library Services, Libraries in Clackamas County (LINCC)
  • Emily O’Neal, MLS - Technical Services Manager, Deschutes Public Library

Sat 11:00 am - 12:30 pm
Program Session

Going Solo in the Library

Sherri Lemhouse

How do you run a Library when you are the only paid staff? From books to volunteers, budget to programing, learn what it takes to prosper as a solo Librarian.

Librarian Sherri will discuss her strategies to try and keep sane in a busy workplace. She’ll speak about purchasing books, passive and active readers advisory, utilizing volunteers, simple programing ideas, patrons and some budgeting. We will save time for questions, suggestions and brainstorming.

Presenter:

  • Sherri Lemhouse, Librarian, Brownsville Community Library

Sat 11:00 am - 12:30 pm
Program Session

Information Literacy, Reading, and Social Responsibility in Learning Goals K-14

Pam Kessinger, Leigh Morlock

The lack of curriculum in Oregon K-12 schools, based on the Oregon School Library Standards (OSLS) and its Indicators, creates inequity for student success. It is well known in library circles that certified teaching librarians are scarce for Oregon schools. The Oregon Association of School Librarians (OASL) have devised Learning Goals for the OSLS, to assist the available teaching librarians in devising sequenced lesson plans, and for aligning their learning outcomes to state and national standards including the Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education (Association of College and Research Libraries).

A new database of the Learning Goals for the OSLS assists in determining scope, and sequence, as well as standard learning levels, for all of the Indicators of the OSLS. The Learning Goals are set for Kindergarten through the first two years of college (K-14). The database includes links to the English Language Arts Standards (Common Core).

This session will provide tips on how to use the database to set up lesson plans and discussion of strategies for preparing students for college level academic research beginning as early as primary school.

Presenters:

  • Pam Kessinger, Library Faculty Dept. Chair, Portland Community College
  • Leigh Morlock, Teacher-Librarian, Jefferson High School Middle College for Advanced Studies

Sat 11:00 am - 12:30 pm
Program Session

Libraries Reaching Young Learners: Partnering with Schools for Student Success

Jana Hoffman, Mike Jansen, Susan Cackler, Greta Bergquist

Libraries can leverage school partnerships to better meet the needs of all students they are serving, even those early learners who aren’t in school yet! Learn from three libraries working closely with their schools to ensure young learners succeed beyond the school day. Participants will have the opportunity to consider how presented strategies could be brought back to their own communities.

Presenters:

  • Jana Hoffman, Supervising Librarian, Ledding Library
  • Mike Jansen, Youth Librarian, Woodburn Library
  • Susan Cackler, Library Supervisor & Program Coordinator, Banks Public Library
  • Greta Bergquist, Youth Services Consultant, State Library of Oregon

Sat 11:00 am - 12:30 pm
Program Session

Stacks and Sutras: Inclusivity and Labor in Library-Museum Collaboration

Ben Gillespie, Franny Gaede, Tom Fischer, Aqsa Khan

This panel discussion will address the takeaways from a two-year experiment in Library-Museum collaboration at the University of Oregon funded by the Mellon Foundation. Geared towards librarians who engage with digital scholarship, museums, or student workers, our conversation will concern the ways in which we used digital projects to address issues of representation in scholarship at UO as well as the ways in which student labor enabled those projects.

From medieval Japanese calligraphy to developing a museum studies OER or mid-20th century psychiatric care in Portland, these projects advance faculty and student research while illuminating potential future joint efforts for the campus GLAM alliance. Our aim is to provide clear steps for other libraries to take in order to showcase diversity through faculty research while highlighting best practices for engaging and benefiting student workers along the way.

Presenters:

  • Ben Gillespie
  • Franny Gaede
  • Tom Fischer
  • Aqsa Khan

Sat 11:00 am - 12:30 pm
Diversity
Program Session

12:30 pm - 2:00 pm Lunch

Saturday Author Lunch

Cascade Ballroom

Join everyone as we wrap up the conference with author David Walker. David F. Walker is an award-winning comic book writer, filmmaker, journalist, and educator. His writing career started in the 1990s with the self-published ‘zine, BadAzz MoFo. In 1997 he produced and directed Macked, Hammered, Slaughtered, and Shafted, a feature length documentary on the history of blaxploitation films.

Walker is best known for his work in graphic novels and comics, which includes The Life of Frederick Douglass (Ten Speed Press), the Eisner Award-nominated series Bitter Root (Image Comics), and the critically acclaimed series Naomi (DC Comics). He has written for Marvel Comics (Luke Cage, Occupy Avengers, Power Man and Iron Fist, Nighthawk, Fury, Deadpool), DC Comics (Cyborg, Young Justice), Dynamite Entertainment (Shaft), and Dark Horse (Number 13). He also teaches part time at Portland State University.

All lunches include a seasonal green salad, bread and butter, and cheesecake.

Options

  • Eggplant parmesan served crispy layered and baked with roasted tomatoes, mozzarella and parmesan cheese. (Vegetarian)
  • Roasted pork loin with calvados cream sauce and seasonal vegetables.

Sat 12:30 pm - 2:00 pm
All Together